Previous Work

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Writing:

“Can Friendship Be Stronger Than War? The Mechanics of Trauma in The Grizzled”  Analog Game Studies Vol. IV Issue I (January 2017).

“First Nations of Catan: Practices in Critical Modification” Analog Game Studies Vol. II Issue VII (November 2015).

Teaching:

“Critical Modifications: Subversive Tactics for Modding Board Games:” Lecture given at Lets Play PA 2017. Discussed theory and practice of creating critical modifications to address issues present in particular games and board games in general, ala First Nations of Catan (see above). Led participants in an interactive brainstorming session to modify other games (February 2017). Watch it here.

“Is It A Game? Game Design Fundamentals:” Guest lecture in Prof. Bob Rehak’s Video Game Theory and History class at Swarthmore College. Designed and ran a simple game to introduce students to basic game design concepts. Led discussion and debrief of game (September 2016).

“Basics of Real-World Game Design:” Mini-course at The Philadelphia School. Middle-school students spent five one-hour class periods learning game design basics, playing mini-games to help them grasp these concepts, and creating a pervasive game to run in their school (November 2015).

Game Design (Lead or Sole Designer):

Leviathan: A two-player mini-game recreating the final scene of Moby-Dick. The Ahab player attempts to locate and harpoon Moby Dick, while the whale player attempts to ram and sink the Pequod. The game uses a “cardiatures” tabletop card movement system, allowing it to be played on almost any table. Seeking publication.

Investigation: A one-time immersive game for the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Players matched images on cards to art in galleries to open secret envelopes and uncover bits of a narrative. When working together, players would assemble a unique story about mysterious goings-on in the museum (September 2015).

Swarthmore College New Student Orientation Game: A one-time game for Swarthmore College. This game ran as three separate events on three different days of new-student orientation, and included clue-solving, physical challenges, and team-building exercises set at key sites across campus (August 2015).

Rittenhouse Spies: A pervasive game in which players took on the roles of a group of spies, one of whom was a traitor. Players solved codes, called phone numbers, found hidden envelopes, and made contact with “secret agents” throughout Philadelphia’s Rittenhouse Square park (monthly throughout 2015).

Game Design (Contributing Designer / Developer):

HEIST: A riff on “Capture the Flag” set in the Art Institute of Chicago. Teams of players secretly choose one painting in the museum to be their “flag.” Rival teams then attempt to locate and “steal” (photograph) that painting and leave the museum undetected. With input from fellow designers at Waxwing Puzzle Co., we developed this game into a playable in-museum experience that then ran for various  client groups (throughout 2014).

 

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